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  • Mellins, who studied autoimmune disease and co-founded a large pediatric rheumatology research network, was a tireless mentor and advocate for her field.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • Osteoarthritis linked to allergic inflammation

    A connection found between asthma, eczema and osteoarthritis indicates that drugs to treat allergic conditions could be used in future studies aimed at slowing the progression of osteoarthritis.

  • Celiac expert Gary Gray dies at 89

    Gastroenterologist Gary Gray, part of Stanford Medicine for nearly 50 years, helped find the molecular cause of celiac disease and a potential treatment.

  • Hepatitis C treatment low

    Antiviral medicine eliminates hepatitis C in 97% of william hill live blackjackpatients, but Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues find that many don’t receive the treatment.

  • Antivirals may benefit some inpatients

    Elevated virus levels in hospitalized COVID-19 patients’ blood predicts worsening respiratory symptoms and suggests ongoing viral replication in later disease stages, Stanford Medicine-led study says.

  • ‘Digital human’ helps reduce knee stress

    A computer simulation that relates muscle activation patterns to harmful pressure on the knee helps participants adopt knee-protective strategies as they walk.

  • Garry Gold appointed chair of radiology

    Garry Gold, who specializes in understanding osteoarthritis via MRI, has been appointed chair of the Department of Radiology, embracing a vision of early disease detection.

  • Immunologist Samuel Strober dies at 81

    Strober, a professor and former chief of immunology and rheumatology, found a way for transplant recipients to reduce or abandon immunosuppressive drugs yet avoid organ rejection.

  • Possible treatment for mucus-induced lung diseases

    Stanford Medicine investigators and their collaborators have designed a compound William Hill online betting appthat’s uniquely capable of blocking excessive mucus secretion — a hallmark of several serious respiratory disorders.

  • Key molecule’s structure found at last

    The structure of a critical cellular-signaling molecule has finally been discovered by Stanford researchers. The finding may lead to new therapies.

  • ‘Military police’ cells stem autoimmunity

    A new study has identified a way that the immune system shoots down its own cells when their anti-viral activity threatens to become friendly fire. The finding could pave the way to new treatments for autoimmune diseases.